Tag Archives: education

Why I will (hopefully) have a successful career

I am inspired this week by a man known as Larry Smith. Smith works primarily as an economics professor at the University of Waterloo. On Monday, he told a room of 100 hundred other students, including myself, why you will fail to have a great career. He then told us how to fix it.

I mean really, have you ever seen a gravestone say “Here lies a terrible parent, an untrustworthy friend, and an unfaithful spouse?”

The main point of his presentation was to follow your passion, or else you will die as wasted potential. He urged us to do something that will make our life worth living, and not just about making a living. One thing I really enjoyed about Smith’s talk was how down-to-earth he was. His presentation was essentially an expansion of the TED talk he had presented for TEDxUW, which I felt was too short to do him justice. He was very much aware of the common issues students—and people in general—have when they want to pursue a job based on passion: the risk , the loss of resolve, and the hardships of actually making a living off that passion.

by nogiba

the Risk

For students such as I who are in the middle/late stage of their first university degree, it can be a frightening thing to think about what will happen to our future. Like many in post-secondary institutions, I chose my program not for passion but for the guarantee of a safe living (well even then, I can’t say it’s a guarantee since I haven’t actually graduated yet, heh). During the Q&A portion of the talk, a student raised his concern over the dissociation between his passion and his current program of study. Smith responded with two major points: sacrifices must be made, unconventional connections always exist. Even if you already have a well-paying job or have already graduated, if you are feeling dissatisfied with your career and you have a passion so strong you want to quit your job to fulfill it, you will find a way. It will be at that point that your creativity, resourcefulness, and determination will be your best friends. How will you know if your passion is strong enough?

Oh, you’ll know. And if you don’t know, it means you’ve never felt it. Once it hits you, you’ll know you have your passion.

Continue reading

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Caine’s Arcade: Dreams come true on the Internet

Caine is a boy from East LA that runs a cardboard arcade in his father’s auto parts store. When he first set up his arcade, he dreamed of having lots of customers play his on his homemade machines, but his father’s customers were not very open to playing in the arcade. Caine’s first customer, and the driving force behind this viral dream-come-true, was Nirvan Mullick. Nirvan happened to pass by the auto parts shop when he saw Caine’s arcade. Nirvan was impressed by the little boy’s creativity: Cain had implemented a ticket dispensing mechanism that consisted of crawling behind the cardboard machine and feeding tickets through a rectangular slit. He also had a working claw machine made up of a hook attached to a string which traveled along a track pad, and a security system featuring unique number codes inscribed in marker on each fun pass. Nirvan was so impressed he organized a flash mob of customers for Caine, an event that rounded up hundreds of people and ignited Caine’s online fame.

Although Caine’s innovative contraptions are clear examples of his intelligence, Caine doesn’t do well in school and struggles to sit down and do his homework. I feel like this is an example of a fundamental issue in many educational systems, a problem I described in my previous post. Educational systems concentrate only on a few aspects of the human intelligence. There are still so many other types of human intelligence and learning styles that are not emphasized in the typical school curriculum. It would shame me to believe that a brilliant child such as Caine may have been brought up feeling he was completely stupid because he does not do well in school. How can we be proud of our North American system of universal education when so many children are deprived of a true learning experience?

I’ll keep this post short, since I believe the linked documentary says so much more about the wonders of nurturing children successfully. Alas, I am not an educator by profession. Check out this blog post by a qualified educator to read more about the problems in the standard educational system.

Here’s a link to Caine’s official website, where you will find more information about Caine’s Arcade foundation.

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“I’m smart. You’re not.” — What’s wrong with our educational system?

Children learn very early in their schooling how to determine intelligence: grades. But is intelligence really this black and white?

This post is inspired by a conversation I had with three good friends from my highschool. As we were having dinner, we started to talk about the relationship between the general beliefs society, how the media affects those beliefs, and the crucial lesson that is almost completely lost in the educational system: how to think critically.

Society’s beliefs are made up of so many factors, but the general consensus is apparent to everyone in the population: bad grades = stupid

With regards to schooling, this consensus has driven us to severely undermine the potential of students based on their performance in school. We are told at a young age that if we work hard, we will get a good education, which will then lead us to a good job. This is something many youth don’t believe, and they have reason not to. Post-secondary degrees no longer guarantee jobs, but students aren’t being presented with appealing alternatives. This is to say that young adults that don’t get a post-secondary education, be it by choice or because of poor grades, are being viewed as “failures” by society.

I think this view is mostly because of the interpretation of good grades as intelligence. This is so false a notion I cannot even fathom how much I hate this mode of thinking. BLARGH. There are seven types of intelligences:

Your grades do NOT measure your intelligence! The only intelligence that gets measured in the common classroom is logical-mathematical. Every other intelligence gets shunned within classroom walls or is only implicitly acknowledged. Classes that are available to students which focus on the other intelligences tend to be undermined. Our society doesn’t value “skills that aren’t in the standard curriculum” (frenchfirecracker) and this is stunting the potential of many students. As a result, intelligent people are thinking that they are not intelligent because their strength lies in intelligences that aren’t reflected in their school grades.

When I was going through highschool, university was the most realistic option. My parents were (are) both working and I had good grades. I had not even considered any alternatives to a university education. I wasn’t aware there were any alternatives—like apprenticeship and vocational studies—as I completed my application forms to McMaster University and the University of Waterloo. In highschool, there was this constant unspoken pressure that if you wished to pursue a career that wasn’t in science, math, or business, you would have a hard time getting a job.

I knew many students who weren’t getting good grades but were so, so good at things outside of the classroom. These students were often the ones that grew up hating school and learning.

Education is a process of living and not a preparation for future living. – John Dewey

The youth of today are being saturated by so many mediums of knowledge: television, the internet, books, video games, etc. There is just so much access to new things to learn from, be the information vocational (career-related) or not. It’s no wonder students get bored in school. Why would anyone be interested in knowing the various mechanisms a benzene ring can undergo under acidic conditions when they can instead be learning about something that truly interests them from random websites on the internet? Our students are not getting “dumber” nor is ADHD an epidemic  among them. It’s just that the things they are learning in school and the way in which it is presented to them is just so  boring when compared to things they can learn about on their own, that they would choose to learn about.

What can be done about this lack of interest amidst an oversaturated life of knowledge? I’m not really sure. One thing I do know is that encouraging students to think outside of the box is the best way to prepare them for any sort of future. The educational system doesn’t stress critical and creative thinking enough, at least not for my taste.

School shouldn’t be all about getting the right answer. In the bigger picture of life, there isn’t always a correct answer. What should be more emphasized is the process of getting to that answer by thinking creatively and critically.

This post was inspired by this video by the RSA (an enlightenment organisation committed to finding innovative practical solutions to today’s social challenges) on Changing Education Paradigms. Please take a look and let me know what you think! Is the way our schools are structured enough to prepare our youth for the future? What should change? What needs to change?

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Spring time is daylight saving time… wait what’s that for again?

I know it’s spring when the first thing I hear in the morning is the chirping of birds outside my bedroom window. Bird songs are my favourite part of spring, especially after the silence that can be winter. Not that the silence cannot be beautiful in its own way, but that’s a topic I’m a bit late to write about.

Another mark of the beginning of spring is when daylight saving time begins. Daylight saving time; that lovely hour of sleep lost in the human  attempt to efficiently match the hours of the day with the altering levels of sun exposure the Earth receives as it orbits around the sun (well actually, this statement changes for different parts of the world). Mind you, I’m not an astronomer so I cannot explain nor do I fully understand the history of daylight saving.

So I decided to Wiki it to learn get a basic idea. It turns out that there is a lot of controversy on the topic. Back when daylight saving time was first implemented, it was meant to be a means for which people could save fuel in the evenings, when incandescent lights were still the norm. There’s a lot of conflicting reports, however, as to whether or not it is actually worth the loss of sleep. Continue reading

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